Restoration complete at Gleneagles’ King’s Course

Work to restore elements of James Braid’s original design at The King’s Course at Gleneagles in Perth & Kinross, Scotland, has reached completion.

Gleneagels - ready

“We’ve got three courses at Gleneagles, all of  which are maintained to the same standard with the same level of investment,” said Scott Fenwick, golf courses and estate manager at Gleneagles. “We wanted to give King’s and Queen’s that heathland feel, but almost ‘inland linksy’ feel and encourage pitch and run shots.”
Fenwick explained that fairway lines have been brought back out to their original location using old photography and video footage. The bunkers are now once again the defining edge of the fairways, rather than sitting in the semi roughs.
“Over the years the sand lines on The King’s Course had been brought down to stop stones and gravel contamination,” said Fenwick.
“We wanted to raise these back up and make them visible.”
The team at Gleneagles installed the Capillary Concrete bunker liner in order to raise these lines, stop contamination, and improve the drainage of the bunkers and prevent washouts.
“Our target window for installation on The King’s Course was November 2015 through to March 2016, which the only period we could get the golf course shut,” explained Fenwick.
“It was decided that Capillary Concrete was the best product for the conditions we’d be installing in. It’s been very successful, with the bunkers performing really well. It was always going to be a
challenge installing liners over the winter period, but Capillary Concrete gave us the ability to do that.”

FROM THE ARCHIVE
Gleneagels achiveThis photo from the 1920s shows the 14th hole on
The King’s Course, and shows the James Braid’s
original design with the pot bunkers

 

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